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Malting barley growers are being encouraged to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions – helping to future-proof their businesses and lower their environmental impact. It... Barley growers to reduce emissions

Malting barley growers are being encouraged to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions – helping to future-proof their businesses and lower their environmental impact.

It follows a collaboration between Simpsons Malt and BASF. The companies are working with grower groups this winter and spring to record how they can reduce scope 3 emissions in the distilling supply chain.

Simpsons Malt is one of the largest, independent, family-owned malting companies in the world. It can produce around 300,000 tonnes of malt annually and supply it to distillers and brewers across the globe.

The company has two maltings in the UK – in Norfolk and Northumberland. Located in prime English barley growing territory, the Tivetshall St Margaret maltings has been producing malt since 1872.

The agreement with BASF will support Simpsons Malt, a fifth-generation business to deliver on its commitment to achieve carbon neutral malting barley and distilling wheat production by 2030.

Ambitious targets

Simpsons sustainabiltiy manager Ben Gothorp said: “The distilling sector has ambitious climate targets and, given the strength of their brands and the storytelling that underpins them, a more sustainable, decarbonised supply chain is important to achieve.”

BASF’s role in the partnership is to record all on-farm crop management practices via its Carbon Farming Platform. This will help determine the impact different on-farm decisions would have on the carbon position of the final, harvested crop.

BASF will validate Simpsons Malt’s work by monitoring and reporting whether it has achieved its target reduction of scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions as part of its Gold Standard Value Change Programme.

Mr Gothorp says benefits will be gained by the whole supply chain. “It’s all about helping farmers to build resilience in their business, more sustainable practices and to ensure that we can give full transparency to our customers.”

Provenance

Whether a distillery takes malt supplied by five farmers or 150 farmers, Mr Gothorp says the combined total of greenhouse gas emissions and reduction – as well as the grain’s provenance – is fundamental to the integrity of the final product.

As well as recording on-farm practices, the partnership will provide Simpsons Malt’s growers with practical guidance on how their choices – including cultivation methods and fertiliser programmes – can change a farm’s carbon footprint.”

Challenges

BASF Agricultural Solutions business director Joel Johnson says: “This partnership will demonstrate how beginning with growers, all partners are in dealing with the challenges of producing food and drink sustainably.”

The Carbon Farming Platform was developed by BASF to improve fact-based understanding of the trade-offs within and across farming systems and processes. The aim of the platform is to make agricultural practices more sustainable.