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Kuhn’s popular Striger 600R strip-till cultivator will be a main feature on its stand at Groundswell, highlighting how growers can reduce soil movement to... Targeted cultivation is focus at Groundswell

Kuhn’s popular Striger 600R strip-till cultivator will be a main feature on its stand at Groundswell, highlighting how growers can reduce soil movement to improve structure, along with lowering operating costs.

The Striger works soil in precise narrow bands to match seed placement. This leaves the rest of the field undisturbed, which saves fuel and helps to improve soil structure across the field.

Kuhn arable product specialist Edd Fanshawe believes Groundswell is an increasingly important show for a growing market. Growers are interested in optimising their costs of production and improving soil health, he says.

Versatile machine

“More growers are looking to reduce soil movements through innovative cultivation techniques and models we are displaying highlight the versatility of the Kuhn range and how it can be adapted to different field techniques.”

The Striger features a series of row units that are independent from the frame, with a depth gauge wheel at the front followed by an opening disc to cut through trash. Debris cleaners clear any surface residues from the strip.

A leg then loosens the soil between depths of 70-300mm. Following deflector discs prevent soil from leaving the strip before rear press wheels reconsolidate the planting line to preserve moisture.

“During a recent maize trial, the Striger was compared to a conventional establishment system. Key outcomes included significantly lower diesel use on the strip-till area to achieve the same end yield and improved plant establishment and early growth.

The Striger 600R will be joined by a Performer 4000 with SH 600 tank and seeding kit fitted. The SH 600 option was introduced last year and offers growers the ability to sow a cover crop in a one pass system.

The machine will be on stand F42 in the demonstration field at Groundswell. Mr Fanshawe says: “Machine travel at harvest was noticeably better, with fewer ruts, and water filtration had improved with less water remaining on the soil surface.”