Thursday, December 14, 2017

Form a ‘Class Q’ for permitted development rights

December 1, 2017 by  
Filed under News & Business

Redundant buildings could provide some much-needed income for farmers, with strong sale values achieved under Class Q Permitted Development Rights.

Introduced in 2014, Class Q is a form of permitted development which allows the change of use of certain buildings from agriculture to residential – although doing so has been the subject of a great deal of discussion in recent years.

Much debate has revolved around disputes between planning officers and applicants regarding the interpretation of Class Q criteria. Nationally, there continues to be a high refusal rate, but rural business consultants Bidwells has a success rate of over 95%.

Class Q Permitted Development Rights have “changed the way we look at certain buildings and the potential of redundant agricultural buildings with the possible values achieved,” says Cath Anthony, partner at Bidwells, Cambridge.

“We have recently sold two redundant barns for prices substantially above their guide. Both barns had limited potential, being fairly remote and too small for alternative uses. But the interest – once Class Q was achieved – was exceptional, with a huge number of offers received on both plots.”

Planning permission

The rights have been widely reported as an easy way to achieve residential planning permission.

But some 60% of applications are refused nationally, making it is essential to take proper advice – first to minimise the chances of refusal and secondly to maximise the opportunity or value.

“The fees for obtaining the permitted development rights on the two barn sites were under 5% of the values obtained, so there has been an excellent return on investment for our clients,” says Ms Anthony.

It is also important to consider the long-term goals and plans for your farm. That is because the use of Class Q Permitted Development Rights will prevent you from applying for a new agricultural building under Permitted Development for 10 years.

And if you have constructed a new agricultural building under Permitted Development Rights since 20 March 2013, you will not be able to apply for class Q until at least 2023. Full planning permission for buildings to avoid losing Class Q Rights is always an option.

Stepping Stone

Class Q can also be used as a stepping stone to achieving something which would require full planning permission. If the building is to be sold, residential will almost always provide the highest return. But if it is to be retained and let out, commercial or office use may be more lucrative.

Class R Permitted Development Rights allow a change of use of buildings and land from agriculture to commercial. This, and a range of other permitted development rights, offers opportunity without the need – and cost – to prepare a full planning application, says Ms Anthony.

studiopress

barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi golden goose saldi doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher doudoune moncler pas cher moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online moncler outlet online