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Biological seed treatment Integral Pro has been granted approval for linseed – helping farmers to achieve premiums. Biological seed treatment on linseed approved

Biological seed treatment Integral Pro has been granted approval for linseed – helping farmers to achieve premiums.

The extension of authorisation of minor use (EAMU) registration for the BASF product will make it easier for growers to meet seed certification standards by reducing levels of seed borne disease, says the company.

Integral Pro enhances crop establishment by boosting plant health, improving its defences and allowing crops to get away faster, says BASF market manager Sarah Middleton.

‘Useful tool’ 

“With no chemical seed treatment options available, the use of biologicals such as this is an extremely useful tool to have, and the approved extension to use in linseed will be welcomed by both growers and processors.”

Trials by linseed specialist Premium Crops have shown the applying Integral Pro to both yellow and brown crop types can decrease seed borne infections from 20% to below 5% – allowing for certification.

On average, almost half of all seed crops submitted for certification fail. The most frequently observed seed borne pathogen species are Botrytis and Fusarium – causing mould on seeds and seedling, reducing germination and killing the plant.

Reducing risk

Premium Crops seed production manager Nigel Padbury says Botrytis and Fusarium species are widely found in the environment – common across years and geographic areas.

“The difficulty that we have is that the

occurrence of the disease is so erratic, growers do not know if or when their crops will be affected. This is compounded by the fact that there is no field test available, only a two week lab based test.”

Mr Padbury adds: “Using Integral Pro will help our linseed growers achieve their premiums by significantly reducing the biggest risk to the crop and ensure quality seed to meet the ever increasing demand.”

The area of winter linseed grown increased threefold last year alone, as farmers sought an alternative break crop to winter oilseed rape.